Rodents and different pests are out in pressure throughout Maitland | Newcastle Herald

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News, Local News, Rodents, Breeding, Maitland, How To Get Rid Of Rats And Mice, Pest Control

As if fighting the drought wasn’t enough, the relief of summer rain and warm temperatures has sparked a breeding frenzy between Maitland and Merriwa. Pest control experts have warned that mice, who can produce a litter every 21 days from six weeks of age, can easily get out of control. The infestation is not as bad as the “carpet of mice” reported in other parts of NSW and Queensland, but it is still significant. Their presence near homes and rural properties attracts snakes, which has resulted in pets being bitten and the number of calls to snake catchers increasing. “From Maitland to Merriwa there are major rodent problems. This reflects the transition from a dry time to a time of good conditions,” said Tony Ceccato of Australian Pest Solution of the Hunter. “All the grass seeds are for eating and they have covered a lot of grass from owls and other birds of prey, especially in semi-urban areas.” We saw some snakes while we were out and about Jobs too. “Mice have also been seen in the fields in the Hunter Valley vineyards and on the paddocks of the farmers. While vintner Bruce Tyrrell has not yet seen them walking among the vines, he plucked one from a container on Semillon Morning Thursday. Other pests also use the favorable conditions. Termite, spider and flea infestations are also increasing. Fleas breed quickly when it rains after a dry spell and termites need moisture and thrive in damp conditions. “Lots of rain this summer and that has created and seen much more moisture that pests were becoming more active, “said Jacob Bell of Jacob Bell of Jacob Bell Pest Control Services in East Maitland.” There is a lot of construction going on and a lot of soil being excavated and many rodent nesting sites would have been disrupted so they would look for another place to call home. They like to find their way into the house or into the ceiling or shed to nest. “Mr Ceccato urged residents with birds of prey, snakes and lizards to use bait that restricted transmission to other animals. He said catching and releasing traps were another option. The recent heat wave has taken a little break from snake sightings. Snake catcher Judith Martin said snakes retreated to a cool place on a hot day, just like us, and that has reduced the number of snake sightings during the day. “People see them later in the day or even late in the evening because of them is too hot during the day. “A lot of people think snakes like the heat, but they don’t.”

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February 2, 2021 – 10:00 a.m.

ON THE CASE: Jacob Bell of East Maitland, which owns Jacob Bell Pest Control Services, was busy baiting rodents.  Picture: Marina Neil

ON THE CASE: Jacob Bell of East Maitland, which owns Jacob Bell Pest Control Services, was busy baiting rodents. Picture: Marina Neil

As if fighting the drought wasn’t enough, the relief of summer rain and warm temperatures has sparked a breeding frenzy between Maitland and Merriwa.

Pest control experts have warned that mice, who can produce a litter every 21 days from six weeks of age, can easily get out of control.

The infestation is not as bad as the “carpet of mice” reported in other parts of NSW and Queensland, but it is still significant.

Their presence near homes and rural properties attracts snakes, which has resulted in pets being bitten and the number of calls to snake catchers increasing.

“From Maitland to Merriwa there are major rodent problems. This reflects the transition from a dry time to a time of good conditions,” said Tony Ceccato of Australian Pest Solution of the Hunter.

“All grass seeds are for eating and they have a lot of grass cover from the owls and other birds of prey, especially in semi-urban areas.

“We saw a few snakes when we were also out on business.”

Mice have also been seen in the fields in the Hunter Valley vineyards and in the paddocks of the farmers.

While the winemaker Bruce Tyrrell has not yet seen her walking among the vines, he picked one from a Semillon container on Thursday morning.

LUCKY ESCAPE: Bruce Tyrrell from Tyrrell's Wines found a mouse in a container of Semillon grapes.  Image: Max Mason-Hubers

LUCKY ESCAPE: Bruce Tyrrell from Tyrrell’s Wines found a mouse in a container of Semillon grapes. Image: Max Mason-Hubers

He went through the whole system – the thugs and the buckets and on the conveyor belt while being blown up by fans. He popped up in the picking bin and was trying to get up on a piece of wood, so I slipped it under him and flicked it out. He lay down a bit on his back and then got up and quietly walked away.

Bruce Tyrrell

Other pests also use the favorable conditions.

Termite, spider and flea infestations are also increasing.

Fleas breed quickly when it rains after a dry spell and termites need moisture and thrive in humid conditions.

“It rained a lot this summer creating a lot more moisture and pests becoming more active,” said Jacob Bell of Jacob Bell of Jacob Bell Pest Control Services in East Maitland.

“There is a lot of construction going on, a lot of soil being dug, and a lot of nesting sites for rodents would have been disrupted so they would look for another place to call home. They like to find their way into the house or on the ceiling or the Shed for nesting. “

Mr Ceccato urged residents with birds of prey as well as snakes and lizards to use bait that restricted transmission to other animals. He said catch and release traps are another option.

The recent heat wave has taken a little break from snake sightings.

Snake catcher Judith Martin said snakes retreated to a cool place on a hot day, just like us, and that reduced the number of snake sightings during the day.

“People see them later in the day or even late in the evening because it is too hot for them during the day.

“A lot of people think snakes like the heat, but they don’t.”