Orange mice plague: Mechanics warn of auto harm brought on by rodents | The Canberra Occasions

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Mechanics in Central West NSW and the surrounding areas warned of the damage mice are doing to vehicles as they continue to plague the area, but urged people to resist the temptation to place bait in engine compartments or cars. When the temperature drops, the still rampant rodents seek shelter and warmth in vehicles, especially in engine compartments, where they can cause potentially catastrophic damage by chewing through cables or brake and fuel lines. While mouse populations in orange remain patchy, this is a problem mechanics see in the city, but surrounding areas like Molong, Manildra, Cumnock, Yeoval, and Canowindra have been hit significantly harder. Molong Tire and Mechanical’s Andy McKenzie hit social media earlier this week after recently being inundated with multiple rodent damaged vehicles on a daily basis. “I only posted to give people warnings and advice, but it went a bit viral. I’m certainly not the only mechanic seeing this, I know Yeoval was absolutely bruised by the mice so I think they would be seeing a lot, “said Mr. McKenzie. IN OTHER NEWS:” After all, from what I’ve seen, the baits actually tend to attract them, so people shouldn’t put them in their cars or engine compartments. After mice and rats eat these baits, they go in search of water, and they say, “I’ll chew anything to get there.” I think the best people can do is try to find their engine bay If vehicles are parked in safe areas or garages, open the hood after driving as the mice seek this warmth. ” While rat and mouse vehicle damage is not solely due to the current plague conditions in the area, Mr McKenzie acknowledged that the sheer number of rodents is a difficult problem to deal with right now: “There are always rats and mice and we see them every year some vehicles damaged by them, but definitely not in that number. They haven’t come in today either, but it’s still early in the day, ”said Mr McKenzie, who was speaking around noon on Friday. Though not in the same number, Orange mechanic Josh Annis-Brown confirmed that he had seen ‘One or two’ damaged vehicles a week arrive at GB Auto recently, one with ramifications that can also have health implications. Also headlines : “The worst thing I saw was a mouse that died under the carpet of the driver’s seat” and was there to the point of decay, “he said. “It caused the worst smell that stayed in the vehicle after cleaning it, but I’ve seen everything from chewed cabin air filters and air vents to mouse nests under the engine cover or chewing through the wires in the engine harness.” Mr Annis-Brown also gave some advice to vehicle owners, recommending that motorists turn on recycling vents when exiting vehicles to close the fresh air vents, a way to keep rodents out of potentially increasing reporting of mice through gh platforms like the Mouse Alert app, further east and including the outskirts of Sydney, many have led many to believe that the rodent plague is moving. However, CSIRO experts only claimed last week that populations of mice are not migrating to devastating communities further west. Researcher and mouse expert Steve Henry said there are more mice just because the conditions are right. “Mice are currently reacting to seasonal conditions,” he said. “After several years of drought, there was good rainfall and the record grain crops grown in spring and summer provide the mice with excess food. “Protection and food sources together create perfect conditions for mice to thrive and survive.”

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ATTENDEES

June 6, 2021 – 9:36 a.m.

Mechanics in Central West NSW and the surrounding areas warned of the damage mice are doing to vehicles as they continue to plague the area, but urged people to resist the temptation to place bait in engine compartments or cars.

When the temperature drops, the still rampant rodents seek shelter and warmth in vehicles, especially in engine compartments, where they can cause potentially catastrophic damage by chewing through cables or brake and fuel lines.

While mouse populations in orange remain patchy, this is a problem mechanics see in the city, but surrounding areas like Molong, Manildra, Cumnock, Yeoval, and Canowindra have been hit significantly harder.

Molong Tire and Mechanical’s Andy McKenzie hit social media earlier this week after recently being inundated with multiple rodent damaged vehicles on a daily basis.

“I only posted to give people warnings and advice, but it went a bit viral. I’m certainly not the only mechanic seeing this, I know Yeoval was absolutely bruised by the mice so I think they’d be seeing a lot, “said Mr. McKenzie.

“From what I’ve seen, the baits tend to attract them, so people shouldn’t put them in their cars or engine compartments. After mice and rats have eaten this bait, they go in search of water and chew everything to get it.

“I think the best people can do, I think, is try to cool their engine bay after a ride. When vehicles are parked in safe areas or garages, open the hood after the ride because the mice are looking for it.” this warmth. “

While vehicle damage caused by rats and mice is not entirely due to the current plague conditions in the area, McKenzie acknowledged that the sheer numbers of rodents that currently exist is a difficult problem to deal with.

“There are always rats and mice and we see some vehicles being damaged by them every year, but definitely not in that number. Neither have come in today, but it’s still early in the day,” Mr McKenzie said and spoke around noon on Friday.

Though not in the same number, Orange mechanic Josh Annis-Brown confirmed that he has recently seen “one or two” damaged vehicles per week at GB Auto, which could also have health implications.

“The worst thing I saw was a mouse that died under the carpet in the driver’s seat and stood there to ruin,” he said.

“It caused the worst smell that stayed in the vehicle after cleaning it, but I’ve seen everything from chewed cabin air filters and vents to mice building nests under engine covers or chewing through engine harness wires.”

Mr Annis-Brown also provided some advice to vehicle owners, recommending that motorists turn on recycle valves when exiting vehicles to close fresh air vents to potentially keep rodents out of vehicles.

The increasing reporting of mice via platforms like the Mouse Alert app further east and including the Sydney outskirts has led many to believe that the rodent plague is moving.

However, CSIRO experts only claimed last week that populations of mice are not migrating to devastating communities further west.

Researcher and mouse expert Steve Henry said there are more mice just because the conditions are right.

“Mice are currently reacting to seasonal conditions,” he said.

“After several years of drought, there has been good rainfall and the record crops grown in spring and summer provide excess food for mice.

“The combination of shelter and food sources creates perfect conditions for mice to thrive and survive.”