New $100 million weapon to combat mouse plague as chilly climate cut back numbers however rodents nonetheless run rampant in paddocks | Namoi Valley Unbiased

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ADDITIONAL funding for mouse bait discounts is welcomed by New England farmers, but will not help cover the real cost of the plague – the massive loss of production from the destruction of crops, according to a local agronomist. Greg Worland of Pursehouse Rural Tamworth said he believes the number of mice in the city has decreased due to the cold weather, but the rodents are still frolicking in the local paddocks. “Every cold change and every rainfall certainly makes them a little thinner, but I still see a lot of mice in paddocks where there is still shelter and still a source of food,” he said. “They go in and out of their mouseholes, get some food during the day and stay warm at night. There are still some, but definitely fewer.” On Wednesday, the NSW government expanded its mouse support package and announced an additional $ 100 million zinc phosphide rebate program. The new support measure gives farmers a 50 percent discount on zinc phosphide purchases, up to $ 10,000, and is dated January 1 and is expected to last through December 31. It comes after a call by the NSW Farmers and Country Women’s Association lobby group is providing up to $ 25,000 per farm to subsidize 50 percent of the cost of bait products. Also read: Mr Worland said this was certainly welcome news and could encourage local producers to invest more in preventive measures upfront while the numbers are lower. “The main cost of this mouse plague is counted not in the dollars spent on mouse control, but in the dollars lost to lost production as farmers lose hundreds of acres of sorghum crops in some of the poor areas.” he said. “But it will certainly help the farmers; if they might be in the paddocks scratching their heads and wondering if they can afford to bait the mice in small numbers, they might just do it and do it anyway. ” they in their small numbers rather than trying to get them under control while they are out of control. ”He also encouraged producers to adhere to the Environmental Pest Managers Association (AEPMA) regulations, not just to keep the mice successful But also to protect target species such as birds and native animals. There needs to be more education about plague and bait regulations, not just government money, he added. The discounts will be on top of the $ 50 million Dollar package designed for households and small businesses announced last month.

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ADDITIONAL funding for mouse bait discounts is welcomed by New England farmers, but will not help cover the real cost of the plague – the massive loss of production from the destruction of crops, according to a local agronomist.

Greg Worland of Pursehouse Rural Tamworth said he believes the number of mice in the city has decreased due to the cold weather, but the rodents are still frolicking in the local paddocks.

“Every cold change and every rainfall certainly makes them a little thinner, but I still see a lot of mice in paddocks where there is still shelter and still a source of food,” he said.

“They go in and out of their mouseholes, get some food during the day and stay warm at night. There are still some, but definitely fewer.”

The new support measure gives farmers a 50 percent discount on zinc phosphide purchases, up to $ 10,000, and is dated January 1 and is expected to last through December 31.

It comes after lobbying group NSW Farmers and Country Women’s Association asked the government to allocate up to $ 25,000 per farm to subsidize 50 percent of the cost of bait products.

Mr Worland said this was certainly welcome news and could encourage local producers to invest more in preventive measures upfront while the numbers are lower.

“The main cost of this mouse plague is counted not in the dollars spent on mouse control, but in the dollars lost to lost production as farmers lose hundreds of acres of sorghum crops in some of the poor areas.” he said.

“But it will certainly help the farmers; if they might be in the paddocks scratching their heads and wondering if they can afford to bait the mice in small numbers, they might do it anyway.

“It’s about controlling them when they are few in number, rather than trying to get control of them while they are out of control.”

He also encouraged producers to adhere to the Environmental Pest Managers Association (AEPMA) regulations not only to successfully control the mice, but also to protect target species such as birds and native animals.

There needs to be more education about the plague and hate speech regulations instead of just contributing money from the government, he added.

The discounts are on top of the $ 50 million household and small business package announced last month.